Tyranny of numbers

Is Iran’s inflation really slowing?

Posted in Inflation, Macroeconomy, Sanctions by Djavad on January 9, 2019

In my last blog post I suggested that Iran’s inflation may be slowing down, and the latest consumer price data from the Statistical Center of Iran (SCI) suggest that this may indeed be the case.  The Consumer Price Index (CPI) published by SCI rose by 2.6 percent for the month of Azar (November 21 to December 20), an annual rate of increase of 26 percent.  This is high by world standards but low by the standards of this summer, when in August the rate shot up to 127 percent (see Figure 1).  More importantly, it is about the same as the month before, which is why it is safe to say that calmer — not better — times are ahead.  Unfortunately, the reporting of prices has created confusion, some numbers showing inflation slowing while headlines say the opposite.  (more…)

Has Iran’s inflation peaked?

Posted in Macroeconomy, Poverty, Sanctions by Djavad on November 28, 2018

Last June, I wrote on this blog about the return of inflation in Iran, when inflation had jumped from an annual rate of 18 percent in April 2018 to 34 percent in May.  In more recent months, inflation has been running at an annual rate of 78 percent per month, twice the rate in May.  But, for the past two months, October and November, the monthly rate has declined.  Is this a sign that the current phase of high inflation, which started with the collapse of the rial, is about to end?   Containing inflation is critical if Iran is to convince its citizens that economic stability is returning and that the news of hyperinflation and economic collapse are exaggerated. (more…)

The cost of sanctions for Iran’s economy

Posted in General, Macroeconomy, Sanctions by Djavad on July 23, 2018

There is no easy way to determine the impact of international sanctions on Iran’s economy, but looking at the growth rate of the GDP after 2011, when international sanctions tightened, is a good place to start.  The question has become more than an historical curiosity since Trump decided to pull the US out of the Iran nuclear deal and reimposed sanctions.   (more…)

The return of inflation

Posted in General, Inflation, Macroeconomy, Sanctions by Djavad on July 1, 2018

According to the Central Bank of Iran, last month (Iranian month of Khordad, which ended on June 20, 2018), consumer prices increased by 4.3 percent.  This translates into a whopping annual inflation rate of 67 percent.  The government announcement was much less alarming, using the so-called point-to-point inflation rate (Khordad 2018 over the same month 2017) of 9.4 percent.  As I explained in a recent interview in Tejarat Farda (in Persian), the point-to-point reporting is very misleading when inflation is accelerating, and does not fool anyone (any more than I could fool a police officer whose radar registered my speed at 80 miles per hour by claiming that my average speed since leaving home has been below the speed limit). (more…)

How large is capital flight from Iran?

Posted in General, Macroeconomy by Djavad on April 19, 2018

On April 10, Iran instituted new foreign exchange regulations involving three changes: devaluation of the official rate by about 15 percent, restricting movement of capital out of Iran, and making the possession of foreign currency in excess of 10,000 euros ($12,500) illegal.  This policy was largely to stop the run on the rial, but rumors of capital flight may have also played a role. In particular, a claim by a prominent member of the parliament that, as reported in Al Monitor, “$30 billion of capital had fled Iran in the final months of the last Iranian year.” (more…)

Rouhani’s new budget aims to eliminate cash transfers

Posted in General, Macroeconomy by Djavad on December 31, 2017

This post is in keeping with my past practice of reviewing proposed government budgets, but this year’s review takes greater urgency in view of the recent protests in Iranian cities that have been linked to the budget for 2018/19 sent to the parliament just three weeks ago.  The basic elements of the budget are the same as in previous years — keeping the size of the government in check and assigning a minimalist role to public investment.  But there are big cut to a popular cash transfer program that has been in existence since 2010.

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The 2017/18 budget

Posted in General, Macroeconomy by Djavad on April 17, 2017

If President Rouhani is re-elected to office next month, he will be presiding over his fourth frugal budget.  This is how he has gotten inflation down to single digits, and kudos to him for that, but the economic growth that he promised when he was elected has not materialized, and this frugality, borne out of his supply side economic views, is partly to blame.  If you expected to see a more expansive and stimulating budget because you heard oil minister Zanganeh say that oil exports will double in 2017/18, or noted the one-third higher expected oil price in the proposed budget, you might be wondering why this budget is only 10% larger than last year’s (see the number in the table below). You are not alone. (more…)

More of the same (austerity) in Iran’s new budget for 2016/17

Posted in General, Macroeconomy by Djavad on January 23, 2016

For the third year in a row the government has proposed a tight budget, keeping spending constant in real terms.  I am not sure the macroeconomics I studied decades ago has much relevance to Iran’s current economy, but the Keynesian in me says, given the economy’s dire conditions, a bit of fiscal stimulation could not hurt.  The government still believes that inflation rather than bankruptcies and unemployment are the economy’s enemy number one.  But perhaps Rouhani’s economic team is banking on the lifting of sanctions to pull Iran out of recession and generate a modest 5% growth.  This seems to be also what the IMF expects.
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Understanding the rial’s strength

Posted in General, Inflation, Macroeconomy, Sanctions by Djavad on January 18, 2016

Last month a headline (link in Persian) in Eghtesad News read: “Do not buy dollars, it will get cheaper”!  More surprising than the headline was who said it: Iran’s Central Bank Governor, Valliollah Seif.  As his critics were quick to point out, it was unwise for the one official whose economic predictions should be muted and very general — the US Fed’s statements about the future need expert decoding — to claim to know which way the exchange rate will move in the future (you can read here — in Persian — the CBI’s lengthy explanation for the controversial remarks). (more…)

Is the Tehran Stock Exchange a good barometer of Iran’s economy?

Posted in Employment, General, Macroeconomy by Djavad on October 10, 2015

The Tehran Stock Exchange (TSE) has been in the news lately, not because its 22-month downward slide has ended but because four cabinet members highlighted its plight in a letter to President Rouhani.  The letter was written on September 9 but came to light last week.  The brouhaha that followed, however, was not about the TSE and what its poor performance means for the economy, which appears to be heading for a double-dip recession.  Attention has instead focused on division within Rouhani’s coalition government and what it means for the future of his austerity program.  I wrote about these issues for Al Monitor last week; here I’d like to take a closer look at the performance of the TSE — how badly it has done, and why. (more…)